An 8-Bit Fantasy Come True

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As kids in the eighties and nineties we dreamed of being zapped into the worlds our favourite 8-bit creations. Now, thanks to Aled Lewis, we get a glimpse of what our world would look like if the pixelated heroes and villains of classic video games were able to roam in reality.

The pixel-art images were featured on Lewis’ Behance page with the following statement:

“A mash-up of video game characters and photographic scenes. As a kid I would become completely immersed in there crude pixel environments and they would seem very real! I thought it would be fun to try to express how gamers see these worlds. I spent many hours gaming with my siblings and friends when I was growing up and this aesthetic has really come to represent that time.”

What video game character do you want to see come to life?

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(via Visual News)

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One Photograph, Conflicting Perspectives

Homeless Man
PHOTO: Darren Calabrese / National Post

If you’re living anywhere in the colder parts of North America, chances are you’re like me today – wearing two pairs of pants, two shirts and a hoodie and only leaving your house when it’s absolutely necessary. It’s THAT cold. With Canadian temperatures dipping leaps and bounds below freezing point with wind-chill, most of the country is under extreme weather warnings and advisories.

The National Post published this story about the cold conditions the nation is facing and the precautions we should be taking. The story was accompanied by a photograph of a homeless man dusted in snow, asleep on the sidewalk and it stirred many thoughts in my mind.

I understand the intention of the image completely, but something about the fact that someone saw this man and photographed him irks me enough to debate its necessity.

The first thought I have is that of course, the photo drives home an important message. There are people suffering on our streets and this serves as a stirring reminder that winter is cruelest to those without homes. The footprints that trace where people have stepped around him and the people walking in the background paint a picture of the unfortunate reality that people ignore what makes them uncomfortable. In my mind this is no doubt an issue of equality that we should all be working to correct. The image tells a complete story in itself and I can see why the photographer would snap it.

On the other hand I can’t help but feel that the photographer should have sought some kind of help for the man and used that to create an even more interesting story, if not an informative one. Most areas of the country are facing frostbite warnings and in some cases, risk of hypothermia, so I just can’t imagine myself stopping to photograph this scene while for all I know he could need medical attention and at the very least, shelter. To me it seems ironic that in a story about keeping safe from the cold a photographer would pause to capture the image of someone who is highly at risk, instead of immediately getting them care.

I’m currently studying journalism and as such I’ve taken an entire course dedicated to the ethics and laws that rule a journalist’s life and work. For every debate it came down to necessity vs. exploitation to encourage more people to view your pages and pick up your paper. With a simple story about the weather this image felt out of place, especially because the story has only one line about homelessness and not in an informative “this is how to help,” way, but instead says “under such conditions, the city focuses on helping homeless people off the streets.”

If there’s one thing this photo demonstrates, it’s that the city isn’t doing a very good job.

What do you think? Would you have taken this shot at all, let alone to go with a basic story about cold temperatures? Is it the media/photographer’s job to do something or just to tell the story in hopes of encouraging other people?

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Deal Alert: Canon T3i with a 18-55mm and 75-300mm lenses for $599

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B&H Photo has the Canon T3i with a 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS and a 75-300MM f/4-5.6 III lens for $599 (price will update in cart), this package also comes with a 16GV SDHC memory card.

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Photo Challenge: Christmas Photos

Our most recent photo theme was Christmas Photos. We received some great holiday theme photos from the Snapsort community, so check out the gallery below.

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While we're waiting for Santa, I took my own portrait refracted in a Christmas tree toy. Photo by Alexander Zarkov.

The next photo challenge is: Winter Photos

Please send your photo submission to Photo@snapsort.com, along with your name, and a short description of the photo by the end of the day Thursday, January 17. 

Guidelines:

  • The photo should be taken by you
  • You may interpret the theme in any way you would like
  • You agree to allow us to share your image on our Blog and Facebook wall
  • You retain all rights to the photo
  • Please only submit one photo for this challenge
  • Please include a short description of your photo, along with your name
  • Email your photo to Photo@Snapsort.com
  • Be creative and have fun
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Times Square, 1943

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This photo of Times Square in New York was originally taken in 1943 in black and white by John Vachon (“Times Square on a rainy day”). Avzam from Shorpy.com coloured it by matching it to the signage from that time. The original is below.

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